Parkinson's Diseases

Parkinson's disease (PD) is a chronic neurodegenerative brain disorder  that progress on  central nervous system that mainly affects the motor system. It happens when nerve cells in the brain don't produce enough of a brain chemical called dopamine. Sometimes it is genetic, but most cases do not seem to run in families. Exposure to chemicals in the environment might play a role.

Symptoms begin gradually, often on one side of the body. Later they affect both sides. They include

  • Trembling of hands, arms, legs, jaw and face

  • Stiffness of the arms, legs and trunk

  • Slowness of movement

  • Poor balance and coordination

As symptoms get worse, people with the disease may have trouble walking, talking, or doing simple tasks. They may also have problems such as depression, sleep problems, or trouble chewing, swallowing, or speaking.

There is no lab test for PD, so it can be difficult to diagnose. Doctors use a medical history and a neurological examination to diagnose it.

PD usually begins around age 60, but it can start earlier. It is more common in men than in women. There is no cure for PD. A variety of medicines sometimes help symptoms dramatically. Surgery and deep brain stimulation (DBS) can help severe cases. With DBS, electrodes are surgically implanted in the brain. They send electrical pulses to stimulate the parts of the brain that control movement.

Treatment

At present, there is no cure for PD, but a variety of medications provide dramatic relief from the symptoms.  Usually, affected individuals are given levodopa combined with carbidopa.  Carbidopa delays the conversion of levodopa into dopamine until it reaches the brain.  Nerve cells can use levodopa to make dopamine and replenish the brain's dwindling supply.  Although levodopa helps at least three-quarters of parkinsonian cases, not all symptoms respond equally to the drug. Bradykinesia and rigidity respond best, while tremor may be only marginally reduced. Problems with balance and other symptoms may not be alleviated at all.  Anticholinergics may help control tremor and rigidity.  Other drugs, such as bromocriptine, pramipexole, and ropinirole, mimic the role of dopamine in the brain, causing the neurons to react as they would to dopamine.  An antiviral drug, amantadine, also appears ...

Suggestions for Patients

While PD usually progresses slowly, eventually daily routines may be affected—from socializing with friends to earning a living and taking care of a home.  These changes can be difficult to accept.  Support groups can help people cope with the disease’s emotional impact.  These groups also can provide valuable information, advice, and experience to help people with PD, their families, and their caregivers deal with a wide range of issues, including locating doctors familiar with the disease and coping with physical limitations.  A list of national organizations that can help people locate support groups in their communities appears at the end of this information.  Individual or family counseling may also help people find ways to cope with PD.

People with PD may also benefit from being proactive and finding out as much as possible about the disease in order to alleviate fear of the unknown and to take a positive role in maintaining their health.  Many people with PD continue to work either full- or part-time, although they may need to adjust their schedule and working environment to accommodate their symptoms. Additionally:

Getting exercise helps people . Various research studies have shown that regular exercise routines of walking, strength training can help to maintain, or even improve, mobility, balance, and coordination in people with PD.

 

Eat a well-balanced diet that includes fruits, vegetables, and whole-grain products. Drinking plenty of water ensures adequate hydration and may reduce the possibility of muscle cramping. Additionally fruits and vegetables high in antioxidants may also be beneficial to your diet.

Information Disclaimer

The information provided using this Web site is only intended to be general summary information to the public. It is not intended to take the place of either the written law or regulations.

It is not AsabME.com intention to provide specific medical advice to users of the Web site, instead we provide users with information to help them better understand their health, diagnosed conditions, and the current approaches related to treatment, prevention, screening, and supportive care. AsabME.com urges users to consult with a qualified health care professional for diagnosis and answers to their personal medical questions.

تنبيه
المعلومات المقدمة في هذا الموقع موجزة و عامة للجمهور. ولا يقصد بها أن تحل محل القانون أو اللوائح المكتوبة.

المعلومات المقدمه في هذا الموقع ليست لتقديم المشورة الطبية بلالمعلومات المقدمة في هذا الموقع ليست لتقديم المشورة الطبية بل لتوفير المعلومات لمساعدة الزائرين على فهم أفضل لصحتهم من حيث شروط تشخيصها ، المناهج الحالية المتعلقة بالوقاية ، الفحص، العلاج و الرعاية الداعمة . لذا نرجوا من الزائرين إستشاره أخصائي الرعاية الصحية المؤهلين للتشخيص و الإجابة على الأسئلة الطبية الشخصية.

Copyright © 2017-2020 Asab Middle East. The Asab Middle East is not responsible for the content of external sites                                             Email:asabme@asabme.com

  • YouTube
  • Facebook Social Icon
  • Google+ Social Icon
  • Pinterest Social Icon
This site was designed with the
.com
website builder. Create your website today.
Start Now